Must See in Ketchikan, Alaska

Misty Fjords

Misty Fjords

After your done experiencing your dream of fishing in Alaska, make sure your save enough time to visit Misyt Fjords. Magical, enchanting, and incredible are a few words that carry the true meaning of experiencing Misty Fjords National Monument. This pristine wilderness of ice floes, fjords, crystal clear lakes, is truly a majestic spectacle of breathtaking proportions. Misty Fjords National Monument is nearly two and a half million acres of towering cliffs, thundering waterfalls, and glaciers that support a vast array of wildlife.

Accessible only by float plane or boat, Misty Fjords National Monument is 3 hours by sea or 45 minutes by air. If you kayak, there are opportunities to see the glaciers at your own pace, sleep in your own tent or stay at one of the U.S. Forest Service cabins. Tours of the fjords by cruise ship offer unique and memorable experiences like visiting New Eddystone Rock, drink from the icy waterfalls, and view monuments created by Native Americans in pictograph form.

Tongass National Forest

Tongass National Forest

Alaska is more then just world famous salmon fishing. The largest national forest in the world offers incredible experiences for the outdoor enthusiast. Tongass National Forest spans 17 million acres of preserved wilderness housing many different biomes. Experience life in Alaska’s southeast with many recreational and vacation opportunities in Tongass National Forest.

Inhabiting the region for centuries, the native people of the Tongass region have developed a rich culture based around the abundant and rich timber of the area. Totem poles, longhouses, baskets, and clothing were all derived from the land of the area. Red Cedar, Yellow Cedar, Western Hemlock, and Sitka Spruce were some of the high quality woods discovered by explorers to the region. Many of the woods used to make high quality instruments are harvested in the Tongass National Forest. The “Spruce Goose” built by Howard Hughes was made out of Sitka Spruce.

The logging industry touched on all aspects of life for those living in the Tongass, and the skills used in harvesting the land’s timber were evidenced in everything the residents did. An example of this is the “logging carnivals”. These carnivals were composed of varied events, which were derived from the actual logging process, such as axe throwing and tree climbing. Any skill used in the logging trade was made into a sport at these festivals.

Those who visit the Tongass area may do so in a variety of ways. Cruises along the shores of the Tongass by ship is a popular method of experiencing the region, as are taking ferries, pleasure boats, or even kayaks. One may choose to hike or fly to a secluded lake, stay in a wilderness cabin, or just camp out in the fantastic outdoors. There are plentiful opportunities for fun outdoor activities on your way to see the glaciers, or any other natural wonder found here in the Tongass. The Tongass is central to experiencing Alaska the way it was meant to be. There is so much to do and see in the Tongass National Forest, you may find yourself coming back year after year.